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Wedding Veil Style

* Choose a veil that blends seamlessly with your wedding gown, or consider it an accessory and select one that makes a strong style statement.
* If you’ve opted for a simple gown, an embellished veil will help create a more detailed and interesting overall look.
* Conversely, highly detailed gowns look stunning offset by a plain, straight veil.
* The circular veil is a classic style that features a piece of fabric that covers the eyes. It’s best suited to a formal wedding.
* Also typically worn at formal church or grand outdoor weddings, cathedral veils are long and sumptuous, and extend well past the train of your gown.
* The double-layered veil harks back to the 1950s. The upper layer creates a full look at top of the head, while the lower layer of fabric is exposed further down the body.
* Mantilla veils are usually created in lace or embellished with lace trim. Cut in a circular or square shape, they’re usually attached to a headband, comb or clips, and fall flat against the face. They are usually paired with a simple gown so the veil takes centre stage.
* A fun alterative to a traditional veil, the pouf looks stunning with a short, chic gown, or a slinky dress that’s cut on the bias.
* Fingertip veils are another less formal, subtle look, ideal for brides who don’t want their veil to be the feature of their bridal ensemble. They extend to just below the fingertips when your arms are at your sides.
* A streamer veil is a simple, straight style. It can be left unadorned to complement an embellished gown, or detailed with Russian braiding; wide, satin ’50s-inspired edging’; or hand-beaded with diamantés and crystals for brides who love to sparkle and shine.